Financial Aid Initiatives

Cornell has implemented several financial aid initiatives as part of our commitment to provide need-based aid and make Cornell affordable for admitted students. 

Undocumented Undergraduate Applicant Initiative

In response to the Trump Administration's announcement that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is being rescinded, Cornell University has committed to the following:

  • All currently enrolled Cornell undergraduate students who had DACA status (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) will continue to be considered in the "domestic" financial aid pool (need-based, meeting full demonstrated need) for the remainder of their Cornell undergraduate program.
  • Cornell will offer institutional financial aid to admitted and currently enrolled undergraduates who have been long-term undocumented students and who meet the following criteria:
    • Born on or after June 16, 1981;
    • Came to the United States before reaching 16th birthday;
    • Continuously resided in the U.S. since June 15, 2008 up to the present time;
    • Currently in school, has graduated high school, or obtained a general education certificate (GED);
    • Meets financial aid application requirements.
      Undergraduate students who are determined to have met Cornell's requirements will be eligible for need-blind admissions and, if admitted, need-based financial aid meeting full demonstrated need.
      If you meet the above criteria, please contact a financial aid staff member to discuss the financial aid application process.
      Samantha Miller: sm336@cornell.edu, 607-255-0047
      Jessica Potter: jlp272@cornell.edu, 607-255-4772
  • Undocumented applicants residing in the U.S. without DACA status and who do not meet the above criteria should follow the steps to apply for financial aid as an International Student.

Green Card Initiative

Cornell will offer institutional financial aid to admitted and currently enrolled undergraduate international students who have been long-term Green Card applicants but have not yet achieved Legal Permanent Resident (Green Card) status. Undergraduate students who are determined to have satisfied Cornell's documentation requirements will be eligible for need-blind admissions and need-based financial aid like any U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

As part of the aid application process, students will be asked to document the following:

  • Born on or after June 16, 1981;
  • Came to the United States before reaching 16th birthday;
  • Continuously resided in the U.S. since June 15, 2008 up to the present time;
  • Currently in school, has graduated high school, or obtained a general education certificate (GED);
  • Filed an I-485 Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status by no later than June 15, 2008;
  • Meets financial aid application requirements.

If you meet the above criteria, please contact a financial aid staff member to discuss the financial aid application process.

Samantha Miller: sm336@cornell.edu, 607-255-0047
Jessica Potter: jlp272@cornell.edu, 607-255-4772

 

Parent Contribution Initiative

Families with a total family income of less than $60,000, and total assets of less than $100,000 (including primary home equity), will have no parent contribution. Total family income equals adjusted gross income for the tax year that we are looking at for financial aid purposes, plus any business or other losses, as well as any untaxed income. In cases of divorce or separation, we calculate total family income for each parent and add them together.

Low Debt Burden

Cornell guarantees that any family with a total income of less than $60,000, and total assets of less than $100,000 (including primary home equity), will have no parent contribution and no loans in the initial aid package.
Loans may be necessary for some families. Cornell caps the amount of loans a student can have based on their family’s income. The mean debt at graduation among Cornell students who borrow is less than $24,000 – substantially lower than the mean debt of $32,600 for all private college graduates.
In addition, the mean starting salary for 2015 Cornell graduates was $62,980 – that is nearly $10,000 higher than the U.S. median income in 2014. Low debt burden, excellent job placement and strong starting salaries help our students build a solid foundation for their future.

For students who will begin studies at Cornell before Fall 2018

Total Family Income Maximum Loan in Aid Package Each Year
Under $60,000 annually $0
Between $60,001 and $75,000 annually $2,500
Between $75,001 and $120,000 annually $5,000
Above $120,000 annually $7,500

For students who will begin studies at Cornell in Fall 2018

Total Family Income Maximum Loan in Aid Package Each Year
Under $60,000 annually $0
Between $60,001 and $85,000 annually $2,500
Between $85,001 and $135,000 annually $5,000
Above $135,000 annually $7,500