Federal Satisfactory Academic Progress

Federal regulations require Cornell University to establish, publish and apply reasonable standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for financial aid eligibility. The purpose of measuring and enforcing these standards is to ensure financial aid recipients make progress toward graduation.

Satisfactory academic progress is comprised of three areas as required by federal regulations. A student must complete their degree within a specified maximum timeframe, demonstrate they are progressing through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe, and achieve a GPA that is consistent with meeting graduation requirements.

All financial aid recipients are required to meet SAP standards toward completion of degree requirements in order to be eligible for Title IV aid, and when applicable, institutional financial aid programs.

Please note that these standards do not replace or supersede individual colleges’ or schools’ regulations and procedures affecting academic standing, which are stated in the Courses of Study or individual handbooks.

Click on a link below to review the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for your specific program. 

Undergraduate Schools and Colleges

Policy For Undergraduate Financial Aid Applicants

Federal regulations (CFR 668.34) require that Cornell University review the academic progress of students who apply for and/or receive financial assistance. Satisfactory academic progress is comprised of three areas as required by federal regulations. A student must complete their degree within a specified maximum timeframe, demonstrate they are progressing through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe, and achieve a GPA that is consistent with meeting graduation requirements. This policy on satisfactory academic progress applies to all undergraduate students who apply for and/or receive federal financial aid and/or Cornell University scholarships and grants, whether a previous aid recipient or not. Note that the criteria for the New York State Tuition Assistance Program satisfactory academic progress differ from the federal and Cornell University satisfactory academic progress criteria.

Financial Assistance Programs Affected

Federal Programs

Institutional Programs

  • Pell Grant
  • Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
  • Work Study
  • Paul Douglas/Byrd Teacher Scholarship
  • Federal Direct Loan
  • Federal Parent PLUS Loan for Undergraduate Students
  • Cornell University Endowed Scholarships
  • Cornell University Grant
  • Cornell University Loan
  • NY Higher Educational Opportunity Grant (HEOP)
  • NY Educational Opportunity Grant (EOP)

Annual Evaluation

Annual financial aid Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) evaluations will be completed at the end of each academic year and cannot take place until final grades have been posted. This review will determine academic eligibility for the upcoming summer, fall, winter, and/or spring terms. Every student who applies for financial aid must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress, regardless of whether they are a first-time applicant or have received financial aid in the past. Any financial assistance offered for the year ahead is subject to cancellation if the minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress were not met in the year prior. If a student has a late grade posting or a grade change after the annual SAP evaluation, the student’s SAP must be reevaluated using the new information.  The Office of Financial Aid does not automatically review grade changes, but students are instructed within their SAP notification letter that it is their responsibility to inform the Office of Financial Aid of a grade change.

Incoming freshmen and new transfer students will be considered for financial aid for one academic year prior to the evaluation of Satisfactory Academic Progress. At the end of the first academic year of attendance at Cornell University, all students will be evaluated for Satisfactory Academic Progress.  Students will then be reviewed annually until graduation. First Year Spring Admits and students who transfer to Cornell University in January will be evaluated after their first semester.

When a student returns from a period of non-attendance from Cornell, all prior academic activity will be included in future SAP evaluations.

Each student’s record will be reviewed under the direction of the Associate Director of Financial Aid for Compliance and Regulation. Students will be notified of their failure to meet the SAP standards by email notification from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion

Federal regulations specify that a student must complete his/her degree within 150 percent of the published length of the program. The maximum timeframe at Cornell is measured in credits. For example, if your degree program requires 120 credits to graduate, the maximum timeframe for degree completion is 180 attempted credits (120 x 150% = 180). The number of credits required for degree completion, and therefore the maximum timeframe for degree completion, may vary by college and academic program.

Credits included in the maximum timeframe are all attempted credits, even when not a financial aid recipient, and regardless of whether attending full-time or part-time. Attempted credits include:

  • Earned credits – Passed (A through D-), Satisfactory (S), Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Repeated courses – both attempts
  • Withdrawal
  • Failures – Failed (F), Unsatisfactory (U)
  • Incomplete
  • All accepted transfer credits (including AP, consortium agreements, and Study Abroad courses) toward the degree program
  • No Grade Recorded (NGR)

Federal regulations do not allow for the exclusion of courses in which a student has remained past the drop period and earned a grade of ‘W” from its calculation of the maximum timeframe.

Required Completion Rate

Federal regulations require that a student must progress through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe.  Progress is measured for students cumulatively.  In order to graduate within the maximum timeframe, a student must earn at least 67 percent of their attempted credits. Earned credit hours include:

  • Grades of A through D- or S (with credit), Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Transferred credits and accepted AP credits – provided they meet degree requirements
  • Credits earned from a Consortium Agreement or Study Abroad Program

Required Grade Point Averages

Federal regulations require that a student meet minimum cumulative GPA standards to retain eligibility for aid. To meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards, a student must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0.  Earned letter grades of A, B, C, D, and F (including repeated courses) are counted toward the GPA.  INC (incomplete), W (withdrawal), S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), R (multi-term course not yet completed and graded), and GPA from transfer credits are not counted toward the GPA.

Additionally, the Higher Education Act requires a specific review of GPA at the end of a student’s second academic year (after four semesters). Any student with a cumulative GPA under 2.0 after four semesters will be failing to meet SAP standards.

Treatment of Multiple Degrees and Special Academic Situations

Double Majors: A student completing more than one major at the same time will not be given an increased maximum timeframe.  The student will need to submit an SAP appeal that will be reviewed by the College and Office of Financial Aid.  Students pursuing double majors must also meet the same GPA and pace of completion criteria as any other undergraduate student.  If it is determined that a student has earned enough credits to complete a degree, they will no longer qualify for Federal Pell Grant, Federal SEOG, or Cornell Grant and endowed funding.

Major Changes: All attempted coursework is included in the SAP calculation, regardless of a student changing majors.  Coursework is only excluded if a student changes academic careers (Undergraduate to Graduate, for example).

Second Bachelor’s Degree: Similar to double majors and major changes, students pursuing a second Bachelor’s degree will not be given an increased maximum timeframe and will need to meet the same pace of progression and GPA standards as any other undergraduate student. 

Audited Coursework: Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

Academic Amnesty: Title IV regulations do not allow for academic amnesty or expulsion of grades. All courses applicable to a student’s major (whenever taken), are included when evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress.

Remedial Coursework: Title IV regulations require that remedial coursework be included in the qualitative assessment of satisfactory academic progress.

English as a Second Language (ESL): ESL courses that are required as part of the student’s degree program will be considered in the SAP evaluation.

Failing to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students failing to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards will lose their financial aid eligibility. They will be notified in writing of their status by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment and a list of these students will be provided to the individual colleges.

Students terminated from receiving financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP. Neither paying for one’s classes nor sitting out a semester is sufficient to reestablish the financial aid eligibility of a student who has failed to meet SAP. If a special or unusual circumstance contributed to a student’s lack of satisfactory academic progress, the student may appeal the denial of financial aid.

Appeal Process

The letter of denial from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment will describe the appeal process and a link to the appeal form will be provided. Examples of special or unusual circumstances are personal injury or illness, the death of a relative, or other circumstances as determined by the student’s college. The appeal must explain why the student failed to make satisfactory academic progress and what has changed in the situation that will allow the student to make satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation. The Office of Financial Aid may request additional documentation at any point while evaluating an appeal. Documentation examples include, but are not limited to a letter from a doctor, medical care provider, or objective third party (e.g. a minister, social worker, counselor, facilitator, or other professional) that supports the student’s situation.

The appeal must be submitted to the student’s college for evaluation. The college will respond to the appeal in writing within two weeks of receiving the complete appeal and provide a copy to the Assistant Director of Title IV Programs in the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

Undergraduate Colleges

Appeal Contact

College of Architecture, Art, and Planning

College Registrar

College of Arts and Sciences

College Registrar

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

CALS Student Services

College of Engineering

College Registrar

College of Human Ecology

College Registrar

School of Industrial and Labor Relations

Academic Standards Committee

SC Johnson College of Business - School of Hotel Administration

School of Hotel Administration Registrar

SC Johnson College of Business - Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management

Dyson Student Services

If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student should be able to meet cumulative SAP standards by the end of the fall semester, the student may receive aid during the fall semester while on financial aid probation. If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student will require more than one semester to meet cumulative SAP standards, the college may develop an academic plan specifically for the student and the student may receive aid during the fall semester while on financial aid probation. All students on financial aid probation during the fall semester will have their SAP reevaluated before the spring semester. To remain eligible for financial aid during the spring semester, the student must be meeting cumulative SAP standards or standards specified in their academic plan. The Office of Financial Aid will monitor whether a student met the requirements of their academic plan and will work in conjunction with the academic unit for clarification as necessary. Students who fail to make SAP by the end of the fall semester will have their future financial aid eligibility terminated and will be notified in writing by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment. As stated previously, students terminated from receiving financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP.

If the appeal is denied by the Office of Financial Aid, the student will be notified by email of the decision. This notification will also make the student aware of their opportunity to respond and provide more information and documentation regarding their extenuating circumstances, if applicable. While there is no official appeal deadline, all information should be submitted during the term the student is seeking aid, and not after.

Federal regulations prevent a student from submitting the same appeal two semesters in a row. However, there is no limit to the number of appeals a student can submit if they can document there are new circumstances preventing the student from meeting SAP standards. Similarly, there is no limit to the number of semesters a student can be on financial aid probation as long as an approved appeal or academic plan is in place and the student continues to make progress toward their degree.

Graduate School

Policy for Graduate School Students

Federal regulations (CFR 668.34) require that Cornell University review the academic progress of students who apply for and/or receive financial assistance. Satisfactory academic progress is comprised of three areas as required by federal regulations. A student must complete their degree within a specified maximum timeframe, demonstrate they are progressing through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe, and meet the published academic standards and milestones for their degree. This policy on satisfactory academic progress applies to all Graduate School students who apply for and/or receive federal financial aid and/or Cornell University funding in the form of fellowships, assistantships, or grants.

Evaluation

For programs longer than one year in length, annual financial aid Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) evaluations will be completed at the end of each summer term.  This review will determine Title IV eligibility for the upcoming fall, winter, spring and summer terms.

For programs lasting one year or less, evaluations will be completed at the end of each semester and will determine Title IV eligibility for the following semester.  Reviews cannot take place until final grades have been posted. 

Every student who applies for financial aid must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress, regardless of whether they are a first-time applicant or have received financial aid in the past. Any financial assistance offered for the semester or year ahead is subject to cancellation if the minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress were not met in the term or year prior.  If a student has a late grade posting or a grade change after the annual SAP evaluation, the student’s SAP must be reevaluated using the new information.  The Office of Financial Aid does not automatically review grade changes, but students are instructed within their SAP notification letter that it is their responsibility to inform the Office of Financial Aid of a grade change.  

When a student returns from a period of non-attendance from Cornell, all prior academic activity will be included in future SAP evaluations.  

Each student’s record will be reviewed under the direction of the Associate Director of Financial Aid for Compliance and Regulation. Students will be notified of their failure to meet the SAP standards by email notification from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion 

Doctoral Students: 

Except for those enrolled in the Employee Degree Program, a student in a Ph.D. program is to complete all degree requirements in no more than 14 registered semesters from the first registration in that particular degree program.  Summer is not considered a registered semester for SAP purposes.  For M.A/Ph.D. or M.S./Ph.D. students, time to degree commences with the start of the Ph.D. program.

By approval of the dean, up to four additional semesters of registration may be permitted when there are extenuating circumstances.  Students and their advisors are expected to develop a detailed plan for completion when petitioning for an extension of the maximum time for degree completion. A minimum of six semesters of registration is required to earn a Ph.D.

Research Master's Degree Students:

No more than eight semesters are to intervene between first registration in a master’s degree program and completion of all requirements. Summer is not considered a registered semester for SAP purposes.  Students enrolled in the Employee Degree Program are exempt from this requirement. Part-time matriculants are to complete degree requirements no later than twelve semesters from the date of first registration in a program. 

By approval of the dean, up to two additional semesters of registration may be permitted when there are extenuating circumstances.  Students and their advisors are expected to develop a detailed plan for completion when petitioning for an extension of the maximum time for degree completion. A minimum of two semesters of registration is required to earn a research master’s degree.  

Professional Master's Degree Students:

Federal regulations specify that a student must complete his/her degree within 150 percent of the published length of the program. The maximum timeframe at Cornell is measured in credits. For example, if your degree program requires 60 credits to graduate, the maximum timeframe for degree completion is 90 attempted credits (60 x 150% = 90). The number of credits required for degree completion, and therefore the maximum timeframe for degree completion, vary by academic program.

Credits included in the maximum timeframe are all attempted credits, even when not a financial aid recipient, and regardless of whether attending full-time or part-time. Attempted credits include:

  • Earned credits – Passed (A through D-), Satisfactory (S)
  • Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Repeated courses – both attempts
  • Withdrawal (W)
  • Failures – Failed (F), Unsatisfactory (U)
  • Incomplete (INC)
  • No Grade Recorded (NGR)
  • All accepted transfer credits toward the degree program

Courses in which a student has remained past the drop period and earned a grade of ‘W” are included in calculations for the maximum timeframe.

Required Completion Rate

Federal regulations require that a student must progress through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe.  Progress is measured for students cumulatively.  Graduate School students must earn at least 67 percent of their attempted credits. Earned credit hours include:

  • Grades of A through D- or S (with credit)
  • Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Transfer Credits – provided they meet degree requirements

Required Grade Point Averages

Federal regulations require that a student meet minimum cumulative GPA standards to retain eligibility for aid. To meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards, a student enrolled in credit-based courses must maintain a cumulative GPA specified below:

  • Minimum Doctoral GPA is 2.25
  • Minimum Research Master’s GPA is 2.25
  • Minimum Professional Masters GPA is 2.5

Earned letter grades of A, B, C, D, and F (including repeated courses) are counted toward the GPA.  INC (incomplete), W (withdrawal), S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), R (multi-term course not yet completed and graded), and (V) Audited courses are not counted toward the GPA.  

Additionally, the Higher Education Act requires a specific review of GPA at the end of a student’s second academic year (after four semesters).  Any student with a cumulative GPA under 2.0 after four semesters will be failing to meet SAP standards.

Additional Requirements

Doctoral Students: 

The special committee, under the leadership of the committee chair, has primary responsibility for developing the student’s independence in scholarship. Special committees and students are urged to meet at least twice a year. 

To remain in good standing, students must complete the following milestones:

  • Complete the responsible conduct of research (RCR) training prior to the end of the second semester. 
  • Form a special committee prior to the end of the third semester.
  • Complete the examination for admission to candidacy (“A exam”) prior to the start of the seventh semester.
  • Complete the dissertation defense prior to the end of the fourteenth semester.
  • In the second year and beyond, complete the Student Progress Review (SPR) form annually and receive a rating of “satisfactory” or “excellent.”

Research Master's Degree Students:

To remain in good standing, students must complete the following milestones:

  • Complete the responsible conduct of research (RCR) training prior to the end of the second semester.
  • Form a special committee prior to the end of the second semester.
  • Complete the thesis defense prior to the end of the eighth semester.
  • In the second year and beyond, complete the Student Progress Review (SPR) form annually and receive a rating of “satisfactory” or “excellent.”

Professional Master's Degree Students:

To remain in good standing, students must meet the published requirements of their degree program. 

Treatment of Multiple Degrees and Special Academic Situations

Transfer Credit

Research degree students are not eligible to transfer course credits from courses completed at other institutions.  However, Ph.D. students may be eligible to receive up to two semesters of advanced standing based on academic work completed in a prior graduate program at Cornell, in non-degree status at Cornell, at another university after registering at Cornell, and in a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program, as described below.

A Ph.D. student may petition to have study in another graduate degree program at Cornell or study in other graduate schools counted toward the registration requirement. Upon recommendation of the special committee and approval of the Dean, a maximum of two semesters of advanced standing towards the Ph.D. requirements may be awarded for a master’s degree completed at Cornell or at another university. Requests will not be formally considered until the student is registered as a Ph.D. student in the Graduate School.

Advanced work in undergraduate colleges will not be considered for advanced standing unless the work was part of a program previously approved by the graduate faculty.

With the approval of the special committee, a non-degree student whose status changes to a regular degree may be granted two semesters of advanced standing for time completed in non-degree status.

A student who has been awarded the D.V.M. degree by Cornell may receive up to two semesters of advanced standing toward the Ph.D. degree, provided his or her special committee certifies that the work done in the D.V.M. program formed an integral part of the work required for the Ph.D. and that it was of equivalent quality. Approval of advanced standing is made by the Dean of the Graduate School.

A person holding a D.V.M. comparable to Cornell’s may also be awarded transfer of up to two semesters of advanced standing upon the recommendation of his or her special committee and approval of the Dean.

Transfer credit policies for professional master’s degree students vary by program.   

All transfer credits accepted toward the degree program will be included in both the attempted and completed credits for the purposes of SAP evaluation. 

Dual Degrees/Concurrent Degrees

A student completing more than one degree at the same time will not be given an increased maximum timeframe.  The student will need to submit an SAP appeal that will be reviewed by the Graduate School and the Office of Financial Aid.  Students pursuing dual degrees or concurrent degrees must also meet the same GPA and pace of completion criteria as any other graduate student.  

Program Changes

All attempted coursework is included in the SAP calculation, regardless of a student changing programs.  Coursework is only excluded if a student changes academic careers (Graduate to Law, for example).  Milestones will be evaluated under the new program’s requirements.    

Academic Amnesty/Expulsion

Title IV regulations do not allow for academic amnesty or expulsion of grades. All courses applicable to a student’s degree (whenever taken), are included when evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress.  

Audited Coursework 

Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

Remedial and PE Coursework

Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

English as a Second Language (ESL)

Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.  

Failing to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students failing to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards will lose their financial aid eligibility and may be considered not in good academic standing for purposes of receiving funding from Cornell University. They will be notified in writing of their status by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment and a list of these students will be provided to the Graduate School.

Students terminated from receiving financial aid may reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits, meeting the GPA required, and completing all requirements needed to return to good standing for SAP. If a special or unusual circumstance contributed to a student’s lack of satisfactory academic progress, the student may appeal the denial of financial aid.

Appeal Process

The letter of denial from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment will describe the appeal process and a link to the appeal form will be provided. Examples of special or unusual circumstances are personal injury or illness, the death of a relative, or other circumstances as determined by the Graduate School. The appeal must explain why the student failed to make satisfactory academic progress and what has changed in the situation that will allow the student to make satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation.  The Office of Financial Aid may request additional documentation at any point while evaluating an appeal.  Documentation examples include, but are not limited to a letter from a doctor, medical care provider, or objective third party (e.g. a minister, social worker, counselor, facilitator, or other professional) that supports the student’s situation.

The appeal must be submitted to the Associate Dean for Administration of the Graduate School. The Graduate School, in consultation with the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment, will respond to the appeal in writing within two weeks of receiving the complete appeal.   A copy will be provided to the Assistant Director of Title IV Programs in the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student should be able to meet cumulative SAP standards by the end of the following semester, the student may receive aid for one semester while on financial aid probation. If the appeal is approved and the Graduate School determines that the student will require more than one semester to meet cumulative SAP standards, the Graduate School may develop an academic plan specifically for the student and the student may receive aid during one semester while on financial aid probation. 

All students on financial aid probation for one semester will have their SAP reevaluated before the next semester.  To remain eligible for financial aid, the student must be meeting cumulative SAP standards (including meeting any applicable milestones) or standards specified in their academic plan.  The Office of Financial Aid will monitor whether a student met the requirements of their academic plan and will work in conjunction with the academic unit for clarification as necessary.  Students who fail to make SAP by the end of the probationary semester will have their future financial aid eligibility terminated and will be notified in writing by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.  As stated previously, students terminated from receiving financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP, along with meeting applicable milestones.

If the appeal is denied, the student will be notified by email of the decision.  This notification will also make the student aware of their opportunity to respond and provide more information and documentation regarding their extenuating circumstances, if applicable.  While there is no official appeal deadline, all information should be submitted during the term the student is seeking aid, and not after.

Federal regulations prevent a student from submitting the same appeal two semesters in a row. However, there is no limit to the number of appeals a student can submit if they can document there are new circumstances preventing the student from meeting SAP standards.  Similarly, there is no limit to the number of semesters a student can be on financial aid probation as long as an approved appeal or academic plan is in place and the student continues to make progress toward their degree.

Master of Architecture

Policy for Master of Architecture Financial Aid Applicants

Federal regulations (CFR 668.34) require that Cornell University review the academic progress of students who apply for and/or receive financial assistance. Satisfactory academic progress is comprised of three areas as required by federal regulations. A student must complete their degree within a specified maximum timeframe, demonstrate they are progressing through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe, and achieve a GPA that is consistent with meeting graduation requirements. This policy on satisfactory academic progress applies to all Master of Architecture students who apply for and/or receive federal financial aid, whether a previous aid recipient or not.

Annual Evaluation

Annual financial aid Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) evaluations will be completed at the end of each academic year and cannot take place until final grades have been posted. This review will determine academic eligibility for the upcoming summer, fall, winter, and/or spring terms. Every student who applies for financial aid must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress, regardless of whether they are a first-time applicant or have received financial aid in the past. Any financial assistance offered for the year ahead is subject to cancellation if the minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress were not met in the year prior.  If a student has a late grade posting or a grade change after the annual SAP evaluation, the student’s SAP must be reevaluated using the new information.  The Office of Financial Aid does not automatically review grade changes, but students are instructed within their SAP notification letter that it is their responsibility to inform the Office of Financial Aid of a grade change.

New students will be considered for financial aid for one academic year prior to the evaluation of Satisfactory Academic Progress. At the end of the first academic year of attendance at Cornell University, all students will be evaluated for Satisfactory Academic Progress.  Students will then be reviewed annually until graduation. 

When a student returns from a period of non-attendance from Cornell, all prior academic activity will be included in future SAP evaluations.

Each student’s record will be reviewed under the direction of the Associate Director of Financial Aid for Compliance and Regulation. Students will be notified of their failure to meet the SAP standards by email notification from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion

Federal regulations specify that a student must complete his/her degree within 150 percent of the published length of the program. The maximum timeframe for this program is measured in credits. The Master of Architecture degree program requires 114 credits to graduate and as a result, the maximum timeframe for degree completion is 171 attempted credits (114 x 150% = 171).

Credits included in the maximum timeframe are all attempted credits, even when not a financial aid recipient, and regardless of whether attending full-time or part-time.  Attempted credits include:

  • Earned credits – Passed (A through D-), Satisfactory (S), Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Repeated courses – both attempts
  • Withdrawal (W)
  • Failures – Failed (F), Unsatisfactory (U)
  • Incomplete (INC)
  • No Grade Recorded (NGR)
  • All accepted transfer credits (including equivalency credits) toward the degree program

Federal regulations do not allow for the exclusion of courses in which a student has remained past the drop period and earned a grade of ‘W” from its calculation of the maximum timeframe.

Required Completion Rate

Federal regulations require that a student must progress through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe.  Progress is measured for students cumulatively.  In order to graduate within the maximum timeframe, a student must earn at least 67 percent of their attempted credits. Earned credit hours include:

  • Grades of A through D- or S (with credit), Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Transfer and equivalency credits – provided they meet degree requirements

Required Grade Point Averages

Federal regulations require that a student meet minimum cumulative GPA standards to retain eligibility for aid. To meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards, a student must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0. Earned letter grades of A, B, C, D, and F (including repeated courses) are counted toward the GPA.  NGR (no grade recorded), INC (incomplete), W (withdrawal), S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), R (multi-term course not yet completed and graded), and GPA from transfer credits are not counted toward the GPA.

Additionally, the Higher Education Act requires a specific review of GPA at the end of a student’s second academic year (after four semesters).  Any student with a cumulative GPA under 2.0 after four semesters will be failing to meet SAP standards.

Treatment of Multiple Degrees and Special Academic Situations

Program Changes:  All attempted coursework is included in the SAP calculation, regardless of a student changing programs.  Coursework is only excluded if a student changes academic careers (Graduate to Law, for example).

Academic Amnesty/Expulsion: Title IV regulations do not allow for academic amnesty or expulsion of grades. All courses applicable to a student’s degree (whenever taken), are included when evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress.

Audited Coursework:  Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

English as a Second Language (ESL), Remedial and PE Coursework: Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

Failing to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students failing to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards will lose their federal financial aid eligibility. They will be notified in writing of their status by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment and a list of these students will be provided to the College of Architecture, Art, and Planning.

Students terminated from receiving financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP. Neither paying for one’s classes nor sitting out a semester is sufficient to reestablish the financial aid eligibility of a student who has failed to meet SAP. If a special or unusual circumstance contributed to a student’s lack of satisfactory academic progress, the student may appeal the denial of financial aid.

Appeal Process

The letter of denial from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment will describe the appeal process and a link to the appeal form will be provided. Examples of special or unusual circumstances are personal injury or illness, the death of a relative, or other circumstances as determined by the student’s college. The appeal must explain why the student failed to make satisfactory academic progress and what has changed in the situation that will allow the student to make satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation.  The Office of Financial Aid may request additional documentation at any point while evaluating an appeal.  Documentation examples include, but are not limited to a letter from a doctor, medical care provider, or objective third party (e.g. a minister, social worker, counselor, facilitator, or other professional) that supports the student’s situation.

The appeal must be submitted to the College Registrar for evaluation. The college will respond to the appeal in writing within two weeks of receiving the complete appeal and provide a copy to the Assistant Director of Title IV Programs in the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment. If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student should be able to meet cumulative SAP standards by the end of the fall semester, the student may receive aid during the fall semester while on financial aid probation. If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student will require more than one semester to meet cumulative SAP standards, the college may develop an academic plan specifically for the student and the student may receive aid during the fall semester while on financial aid probation. 

All students on financial aid probation during the fall semester will have their SAP reevaluated before the spring semester.  To remain eligible for financial aid during the spring semester, the student must be meeting cumulative SAP standards or standards specified in their academic plan.  The Office of Financial Aid will monitor whether a student met the requirements of their academic plan and will work in conjunction with the College Registrar for clarification as necessary.  Students who fail to make SAP by the end of the fall semester will have their future financial aid eligibility terminated and will be notified in writing by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.  As stated previously, students terminated from receiving financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP.

If the appeal is denied by the Office of Financial Aid, the student will be notified by email of the decision.  This notification will also make the student aware of their opportunity to respond and provide more information and documentation regarding their extenuating circumstances, if applicable.  While there is no official appeal deadline, all information should be submitted during the term the student is seeking aid, and not after.

Federal regulations prevent a student from submitting the same appeal two semesters in a row. However, there is no limit to the number of appeals a student can submit if they can document there are new circumstances preventing the student from meeting SAP standards.  Similarly, there is no limit to the number of semesters a student can be on financial aid probation as long as an approved appeal or academic plan is in place and the student continues to make progress toward their degree.

Master of Engineering

Policy for Master of Engineering Financial Aid Applicants

Federal regulations (CFR 668.34) require that Cornell University review the academic progress of students who apply for and/or receive federal financial assistance. Satisfactory academic progress is comprised of three areas as required by federal regulations. A student must complete their degree within a specified maximum timeframe, demonstrate they are progressing through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe, and achieve a GPA that is consistent with meeting graduation requirements. This policy on satisfactory academic progress applies to all Master of Engineering students who apply for and/or receive federal financial aid, whether a previous aid recipient or not. 

Evaluation

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) evaluations will be completed at the end of each term and cannot take place until final grades have been posted. This review will determine Title IV eligibility for the following semester.  Every student who applies for financial aid must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress, regardless of whether they are a first-time applicant or have received financial aid in the past. Any financial assistance offered for the term ahead is subject to cancellation if the minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress were not met in the term prior.  If a student has a late grade posting or a grade change after the annual SAP evaluation, the student’s SAP must be reevaluated using the new information.  The Office of Financial Aid does not automatically review grade changes, but students are instructed within their SAP notification letter that it is their responsibility to inform the Office of Financial Aid of a grade change.

When a student returns from a period of non-attendance from Cornell, all prior academic activity will be included in future SAP evaluations.

Each student’s record will be reviewed under the direction of the Associate Director of Financial Aid for Compliance and Regulation. Students will be notified of their failure to meet the SAP standards by email notification from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion

Federal regulations specify that a student must complete his/her degree within 150 percent of the published length of the program. The maximum timeframe for this program is measured in credits. For example, if your Master of Engineering degree program requires 30 credits to graduate, the maximum timeframe for degree completion is 45 attempted credits (30 x 150% = 45). The number of credits required for degree completion, and therefore the maximum timeframe for degree completion, may vary by academic program.

Credits included in the maximum timeframe are all attempted credits, even when not a financial aid recipient, and regardless of whether attending full-time or part-time.  Attempted credits include:

  • Earned credits – Passed (A through D-), Satisfactory (S), Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Repeated courses – both attempts
  • Withdrawal (W)
  • Failures – Failed (F), Unsatisfactory (U)
  • Incomplete (INC)
  • No Grade Recorded (NGR)
  • All accepted transfer credits toward the degree program

Federal regulations do not allow for the exclusion of courses in which a student has remained past the drop period and earned a grade of ‘W” from its calculation of the maximum timeframe.

Required Completion Rate

Federal regulations require that a student must progress through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe.  Progress is measured for students cumulatively.  In order to graduate within the maximum timeframe, a student must earn at least 67 percent of their attempted credits. Earned credit hours include:

  • Grades of A through D- or S (with credit), Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Transfer credits, regardless of source – provided they meet degree requirements

Required Grade Point Averages

Federal regulations require that a student meet minimum cumulative GPA standards to retain eligibility for aid. To meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards, a Master of Engineering student must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.  Earned letter grades of A, B, C, D, and F (including repeated courses) are counted toward the GPA.  NGR (no grade recorded), INC (incomplete), W (withdrawal), S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), R (multi-term course not yet completed and graded), and GPA from transfer credits are not counted toward the GPA.

Treatment of Multiple Degrees and Special Academic Situations

Program/Degree Changes:  All attempted coursework is included in the SAP calculation, regardless of a student changing programs or degrees.  Coursework is only excluded if a student changes academic careers (Graduate to Law, for example).

Academic Amnesty/Expulsion: Title IV regulations do not allow for academic amnesty or expulsion of grades. All courses applicable to a student’s degree (whenever taken), are included when evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress.  

Audited Coursework:  Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

Remedial and PE Coursework: Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

English as a Second Language (ESL):  Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

Failing to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students failing to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards will lose their federal financial aid eligibility. They will be notified in writing of their status by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment and a list of these students will be provided to the College of Engineering.

Students terminated from receiving federal financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP. Neither paying for one’s classes nor sitting out a semester is sufficient to reestablish the financial aid eligibility of a student who has failed to meet SAP. If a special or unusual circumstance contributed to a student’s lack of satisfactory academic progress, the student may appeal the denial of federal financial aid.

Appeal Process

The letter of denial from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment will describe the appeal process and a link to the appeal form will be provided. Examples of special or unusual circumstances are personal injury or illness, the death of a relative, or other circumstances as determined by the student’s college. The appeal must explain why the student failed to make satisfactory academic progress and what has changed in the situation that will allow the student to make satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation.  The Office of Financial Aid may request additional documentation at any point while evaluating an appeal. Documentation examples include, but are not limited to a letter from a doctor, medical care provider, or objective third party (e.g. a minister, social worker, counselor, facilitator, or other professional) that supports the student’s situation.

The appeal must be submitted to the College Registrar for evaluation. The College of Engineering will respond to the appeal in writing within two weeks of receiving the complete appeal and provide a copy to the Assistant Director of Title IV Programs in the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student should be able to meet cumulative SAP standards by the end of the following semester, the student may receive aid during the following semester while on financial aid probation. If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student will require more than one semester to meet cumulative SAP standards, the college may develop an academic plan specifically for the student and the student may receive aid during the following semester while on financial aid probation. 

All students on financial aid probation during a semester will have their SAP reevaluated before being awarded federal financial aid the following semester.  To remain eligible for financial aid, the student must be meeting cumulative SAP standards or standards specified in their academic plan.  The Office of Financial Aid will monitor whether a student met the requirements of their academic plan and will work in conjunction with the College Registrar for clarification as necessary.  Students who fail to make SAP by the end of the probationary semester will have their future federal financial aid eligibility terminated and will be notified in writing by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.  As stated previously, students terminated from receiving financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP.

If the appeal is denied by the Office of Financial Aid, the student will be notified by email of the decision.  This notification will also make the student aware of their opportunity to respond and provide more information and documentation regarding their extenuating circumstances, if applicable.  While there is no official appeal deadline, all information should be submitted during the term the student is seeking aid, and not after.

Federal regulations prevent a student from submitting the same appeal two semesters in a row. However, there is no limit to the number of appeals a student can submit if they can document there are new circumstances preventing the student from meeting SAP standards.  Similarly, there is no limit to the number of semesters a student can be on financial aid probation as long as an approved appeal or academic plan is in place and the student continues to make progress toward their degree. 

Master of Management in Hospitality

Policy for Master of Management in Hospitality Financial Aid Applicants

Federal regulations (CFR 668.34) require that Cornell University review the academic progress of students who apply for and/or receive federal financial assistance. Satisfactory academic progress is comprised of three areas as required by federal regulations. A student must complete their degree within a specified maximum timeframe, demonstrate they are progressing through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe, and achieve a GPA that is consistent with meeting graduation requirements. This policy on satisfactory academic progress applies to all Master of Management in Hospitality students who apply for and/or receive federal financial aid, whether a previous aid recipient or not. 

Evaluation

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) evaluations will be completed at the end of each term and cannot take place until final grades have been posted. This review will determine Title IV eligibility for the following semester.  Every student who applies for financial aid must be making Satisfactory Academic Progress, regardless of whether they are a first-time applicant or have received financial aid in the past. Any financial assistance offered for the term ahead is subject to cancellation if the minimum standards of satisfactory academic progress were not met in the term prior.  If a student has a late grade posting or a grade change after the SAP evaluation, the student’s SAP must be reevaluated using the new information.  The Office of Financial Aid does not automatically review grade changes, but students are instructed within their SAP notification letter that it is their responsibility to inform the Office of Financial Aid of a grade change.  

When a student returns from a period of non-attendance from Cornell, all prior academic activity will be included in future SAP evaluations.

Each student’s record will be reviewed under the direction of the Associate Director of Financial Aid for Compliance and Regulation. Students will be notified of their failure to meet the SAP standards by email notification from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion

Federal regulations specify that a student must complete his/her degree within 150 percent of the published length of the program. The maximum timeframe for this program is measured in credits. The Master of Management in Hospitality degree program requires 48 credits to graduate.  As a result, the maximum timeframe for degree completion is 72 attempted credits (48 x 150% = 72). 

Credits included in the maximum timeframe are all attempted credits, even when not a financial aid recipient, and regardless of whether attending full-time or part-time.  Attempted credits include:

  • Earned credits – Passed (A through D-), Satisfactory (S), Multi-Term Course (R)
  • Repeated courses – both attempts
  • Withdrawal (W)
  • Failures – Failed (F), Unsatisfactory (U)
  • Incomplete (INC)
  • No Grade Recorded (NGR)

Federal regulations do not allow for the exclusion of courses in which a student has remained past the drop period and earned a grade of ‘W” from its calculation of the maximum timeframe.

Required Completion Rate

Federal regulations require that a student must progress through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe.  Progress is measured for students cumulatively.  In order to graduate within the maximum timeframe, a student must earn at least 67 percent of their attempted credits. Earned credit hours include:

  • Grades of A through D- or S (with credit), Multi-Term Course (R)

Required Grade Point Averages

Federal regulations require that a student meet minimum cumulative GPA standards to retain eligibility for aid. To meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards, a Master of Management in Hospitality student must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5.  Earned letter grades of A, B, C, D, and F (including repeated courses) are counted toward the GPA.  NGR (no grade recorded), INC (incomplete), W (withdrawal), S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), and R (multi-term course not yet completed and graded) are not counted toward the GPA.

Treatment of Multiple Degrees and Special Academic Situations

Concurrent Degrees: A student completing more than one degree at the same time will not be given an increased maximum timeframe.  The student will need to submit an SAP appeal that will be reviewed by the Graduate Committee and Office of Financial Aid.  Students pursuing concurrent degrees must meet the same GPA and pace of completion criteria as any other Master of Management in Hospitality student.

Program Changes:  All attempted coursework is included in the SAP calculation, regardless of a student changing programs.  Coursework is only excluded if a student changes academic careers (Graduate to Law, for example).

Academic Amnesty/Expulsion: Title IV regulations do not allow for academic amnesty or expulsion of grades. All courses applicable to a student’s degree (whenever taken), are included when evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress.  

Transfer Credit: The Master of Management in Hospitality degree program does not accept transfer credit.

Audited Coursework:  Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

Remedial and PE Coursework: Excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid.

English as a Second Language (ESL): ESL courses that are required as part of the student’s degree program will be considered in the SAP evaluation.  

Failing to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress

Students failing to meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards will lose their federal financial aid eligibility. They will be notified in writing of their status by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment and a list of these students will be provided to the Master of Management in Hospitality program coordinator.

Students terminated from receiving federal financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP; successfully completing 67% of attempted credits and achieving the 2.5 required GPA before exceeding the maximum time frame. Neither paying for one’s classes nor sitting out a semester is sufficient to reestablish the financial aid eligibility of a student who has failed to meet SAP. If a special or unusual circumstance contributed to a student’s lack of satisfactory academic progress, the student may appeal the denial of federal financial aid.

Appeal Process

The letter of denial from the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment will describe the appeal process and a link to the appeal form will be provided. Examples of special or unusual circumstances are personal injury or illness, the death of a relative, or other circumstances as determined by the student’s college. The appeal must explain why the student failed to make satisfactory academic progress and what has changed in the situation that will allow the student to make satisfactory academic progress at the next evaluation.  The Office of Financial Aid may request additional documentation at any point while evaluating an appeal.  Documentation examples include, but are not limited to a letter from a doctor, medical care provider, or objective third party (e.g. a minister, social worker, counselor, facilitator, or other professional) that supports the student’s situation.

The appeal must be submitted to the Graduate Committee for evaluation. The Graduate Committee will respond to the appeal in writing within two weeks of receiving the complete appeal and provide a copy to the Assistant Director of Title IV Programs in the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.

If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student should be able to meet cumulative SAP standards by the end of the following semester, the student may receive aid during the following semester while on financial aid probation. If the appeal is approved and the college determines that the student will require more than one semester to meet cumulative SAP standards, the college may develop an academic plan specifically for the student and the student may receive aid during the following semester while on financial aid probation. 

All students on financial aid probation during a semester will have their SAP reevaluated before being awarded federal financial aid the following semester.  To remain eligible for financial aid, the student must be meeting cumulative SAP standards or standards specified in their academic plan.  The Office of Financial Aid will monitor whether a student met the requirements of their academic plan and will work in conjunction with the College Registrar for clarification as necessary.  Students who fail to make SAP by the end of the probationary semester will have their future federal financial aid eligibility terminated and will be notified in writing by the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.  As stated previously, students terminated from receiving financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP.

If the appeal is denied by the Office of Financial Aid, the student will be notified by email of the decision.  This notification will also make the student aware of their opportunity to respond and provide more information and documentation regarding their extenuating circumstances, if applicable.  While there is no official appeal deadline, all information should be submitted during the term the student is seeking aid, and not after.

Federal regulations prevent a student from submitting the same appeal two semesters in a row. However, there is no limit to the number of appeals a student can submit if they can document there are new circumstances preventing the student from meeting SAP standards.  Similarly, there is no limit to the number of semesters a student can be on financial aid probation as long as an approved appeal or academic plan is in place and the student continues to make progress toward their degree.

Master of Professional Studies in Management

Policy for Johnson MPS Students

At Johnson, this policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is applied to all Johnson students, regardless of whether financial aid was awarded in the term. In addition to meeting the standard for receiving financial aid, students must also meet the academic standards for their specific MPS program. Failure to meet the below standards will have academic as well as financial aid implications. 

Federal regulations require that Johnson review the academic progress of students who apply for and/or receive financial assistance. SAP is comprised of three areas as required by federal regulations. A student must:

  • Complete their degree within a specified maximum timeframe;
  • Demonstrate they are making progress towards the completion of their degree within the maximum timeframe; and, 
  • Achieve a cumulative grade point average (GPA) that is consistent with meeting graduation requirements. 

This regulation applies to each financial aid applicant, whether a previous recipient or not.

Evaluation

Academic progress is evaluated at the end of each term. This evaluation is completed through a review of grades received, courses attempted, progress toward completing the program/graduate degree and GPA. If a student has a late grade posting or a grade change after the annual SAP evaluation, the student’s SAP must be reevaluated using the new information. The Johnson Financial Aid Office does not automatically review grade changes, but students are instructed within their SAP notification letter that it is their responsibility to inform the Johnson Financial Aid Office of a grade change. Remedial, audited and PE Coursework is excluded from SAP evaluations and not eligible for Federal Aid. English as a Second Language (ESL) courses that are required as part of the student’s degree program will be considered in the SAP evaluation.     

There is no allowance for academic amnesty and all courses applicable to a student’s major (whenever taken) must be included in evaluating a student’s satisfactory academic progress.  This applies to the number of credits attempted and completed as well as the GPA.

When a student returns from a period of non-attendance from Cornell, all prior academic activity will be included in future SAP evaluations.

Maximum Time Frame for Degree Completion

Students are required to complete their program of study within 150% of the length of the academic program. Failure of a student to complete their program within 150% of the published program length will result in failure to make SAP. For a 30-credit MPS program, a student would reach the maximum timeframe when reaching an attempted 45 credits. Note that this regulation measures credits attempted, even if they are not earned. All grades of No Grade Reported (NGR), Incomplete (I), withdrawal (W), failing grades (F) and unsatisfactory (U/UX) are counted in the measure of attempted credits. A repeated course is counted two times in a student’s attempted credits.

Required Completion Rate

Federal regulations require that a student must progress through their program at a pace that will ensure graduation within the maximum timeframe. Progress is measured for students cumulatively. In order to graduate within the maximum timeframe, a student must complete at least 67% of credits attempted. For example, a full-time student who attempts 18 credits in a term must successfully complete 12 credits in that term to meet this requirement. Earned credits include Passed (A+ through D-), Satisfactory (S), and Multi-Term Course (R).  All grades of No Grade Reported (NGR), Incomplete (I), withdrawal (W), failing grades (F) and U/UX are counted in the measure of attempted credits, even though they are not earned credits. Please note Johnson does not award transfer credit.

Required Grade Point Averages       

Federal regulations require that a student meet minimum cumulative GPA standards to retain eligibility for aid. To meet SAP standards, a student must maintain a cumulative GPA as defined in the table below. For the purposes of this regulation, the overall Johnson MPS GPA will be used. The overall Johnson MPS GPA is comprised of all courses designated as MGMT, NCC, NBA, NMI, HADM, AEM, any Cornell University elective courses at the 5000 level or higher, and any course the student petitions to be counted towards their MPS. All grades of Incomplete (I), failing grades (F) and Unsatisfactory (U/UX) are considered an F in the calculation of GPA each term. 

Term Cumulative GPA
1 2.50
2 2.70
3 2.70

 

Failing to Meet Satisfactory Academic Progress

The first time a student fails to meet one or more of the areas of progress above by the end of the term, the student will receive a warning letter. The letter will outline the area or areas that need improvement. A student who receives a warning letter will have one additional term to meet SAP. If a student again fails to meet SAP, the student will lose their financial aid eligibility.  They will be notified in writing of their status by the Johnson Financial Aid Office.  

Students terminated from receiving financial aid can reestablish eligibility by successfully earning the cumulative credits and GPA required for SAP. Neither paying for one’s classes nor sitting out a term is sufficient to reestablish the financial aid eligibility of a student who has failed to meet SAP. If a special or unusual circumstance contributed to a student’s inability to meet SAP, the student may appeal the denial of financial aid.

Appeal Process

The letter of denial will describe the appeal process and will provide a link to the appeal form, also found here. The appeal must explain the circumstances leading to failure to make SAP, and how the special or unusual circumstances have been resolved so that the student will now be able to complete the required number of credits or attain the required GPA. The student may submit supporting documentation from health care providers, faculty, etc., in order to support the appeal. The Johnson Financial Aid Office may request additional documentation at any point while evaluating an appeal.  The appeal form will be reviewed by a Committee of staff members from the SC Johnson College of Business. The college will respond to the appeal in writing within two weeks of receiving the complete appeal and provide a copy to the Assistant Director of Title IV Programs in the Office of Financial Aid and Student Employment.  

If the appeal is approved and the College determines that the student should be able to meet cumulative SAP standards by the end of the next term, the student's financial aid will be reinstated for one term and the student will be given an academic plan to follow. By the end of that term, the student must have successfully completed the required number of credits and/or attained the overall required GPA. Students who fail to make SAP by the end of that term will have their future financial aid eligibility terminated.

If the appeal is denied, the student will be notified by email of the decision.  This notification will also make the student aware of their opportunity to respond and provide more information and documentation regarding their extenuating circumstances, if applicable.  While there is no official appeal deadline, all information should be submitted during the term the student is seeking aid, and not after.

Federal regulations prevent a student from submitting the same appeal two semesters in a row. However, there is no limit to the number of appeals a student can submit if they can document there are new circumstances preventing the student from meeting SAP standards.  Similarly, there is no limit to the number of semesters a student can be on financial aid probation as long as an approved appeal or academic plan is in place and the student continues to make progress toward their degree.

Professional Schools

Policy for Professional Students

SAP standards for professional students are determined and monitored by the professional schools: